X-plat Perl versions of objview, objpict, ltview

Dear list,

this might be of interest to rad-openstudio, but I am refraining from cross-posting.

Whilst doing a bit of Radiance teaching last Friday, I got caught red-face in my attempt to use objview.rb. Installing ruby.zip from the NREL web site (and making sure %PATH% picks it up) did not help--objview.rb kept complaining about missing input files. It appears that somehow, ARGV is completely ignored by the parser once the options are dealt with. However, I know little about Ruby.

Since I need a working objview next Friday, I finished the re-write of objview in Perl, which I started some time ago, but never polished off.

Whilst at it, I also completed a Perl port of objpict.csh.

Both appear to work under LINUX and Windows Vista. Zip archive with Windows exe files is here:
http://www.jaloxa.eu/pickup/win_objpict_objview.zip

Your feedback would be much appreciated.

Since the Windows objview.rb has some extra functionality over the UNIX csh version (namely ltview), I started work on a x-plat ltview.pl, but have I admit that I'm not sure what it is meant to do:

a) if ltview is meant to show the actual luminaire (or fixture for you non-Europeans), then are not objview or objpict good enough?

b) if, on the other hand, it is the actual photometric distribution that matters, then would it not be better to extract the dat file of the distribution, and suspend a little disk or square with that distribution applied to it. The command line parser could then be extended to
- include an option that might cause it to put the disk inside a sphere rather than a box; and/or
- render a -vta fisheye view from just below this disk, so that the entire photometric distribution might be appreciated.

I'm happy enough to look into this if it is felt that the Windows version of objview and the 'official' one should be based on the same code. Would need some guidance, though as to what ltview should do.

Good night and good luck

Axel

PS: I'd love to call it 'iesview', but this name is already taken by an add-on to AGI32. Works pretty well, actually (under Windows).
@Ian, we probably have to thank you for this little gem?

Hi Axel, et al.,

objview.rb works fine on my Mac, I tested this on Linux and Win too (since Win compatibility was the whole point). It's expecting a .rad file which references a .dat file (products of the ies2rad program). Maybe we could work offline to find the source of your error? Otherwise...

The purpose of ltview was to show both the luminaire (or fitting, for you U.K. people) and the distribution. It worked for me, and I thought it might be useful for others. You can see the shape of the luminous aperture polygon, the size, the orientation, and the general distribution. You could also ping surfaces in the box for radiance or irradiance, learning a little more about the distribution and the scaling. Since ltview was a copy of objview, it seemed to make sense to shove it all into one place when I wrote the Ruby port. While no one was happy to have another dependency, it WAS nice to have objview available to Windows users. If your Perl port(s) works, we should probably drop the Ruby port, since objview/ltview is the only reason for installing Ruby if you merely want to use the Radiance binaries (using OpenStudio is a different matter).

I wouldn't call it iesview though, since what we're looking at is a Radiance light description -- which may or may not be derived from an ies file. =8-)

- Rob

···

On Dec 1, 2013, at 3:06 PM, Axel Jacobs <[email protected]> wrote:

Dear list,

this might be of interest to rad-openstudio, but I am refraining from cross-posting.

Whilst doing a bit of Radiance teaching last Friday, I got caught red-face in my attempt to use objview.rb. Installing ruby.zip from the NREL web site (and making sure %PATH% picks it up) did not help--objview.rb kept complaining about missing input files. It appears that somehow, ARGV is completely ignored by the parser once the options are dealt with. However, I know little about Ruby.

Since I need a working objview next Friday, I finished the re-write of objview in Perl, which I started some time ago, but never polished off.

Whilst at it, I also completed a Perl port of objpict.csh.

Both appear to work under LINUX and Windows Vista. Zip archive with Windows exe files is here:
http://www.jaloxa.eu/pickup/win_objpict_objview.zip

Your feedback would be much appreciated.

Since the Windows objview.rb has some extra functionality over the UNIX csh version (namely ltview), I started work on a x-plat ltview.pl, but have I admit that I'm not sure what it is meant to do:

a) if ltview is meant to show the actual luminaire (or fixture for you non-Europeans), then are not objview or objpict good enough?

b) if, on the other hand, it is the actual photometric distribution that matters, then would it not be better to extract the dat file of the distribution, and suspend a little disk or square with that distribution applied to it. The command line parser could then be extended to
- include an option that might cause it to put the disk inside a sphere rather than a box; and/or
- render a -vta fisheye view from just below this disk, so that the entire photometric distribution might be appreciated.

I'm happy enough to look into this if it is felt that the Windows version of objview and the 'official' one should be based on the same code. Would need some guidance, though as to what ltview should do.

Good night and good luck

Axel

PS: I'd love to call it 'iesview', but this name is already taken by an add-on to AGI32. Works pretty well, actually (under Windows).
@Ian, we probably have to thank you for this little gem?

_______________________________________________
Radiance-dev mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-dev

Since this is automatically an improvement over the existing shell scripts, I've gone ahead and checked your new objpict.pl and objview.pl into the CVS HEAD. I did a couple of checks to make sure they worked as advertised (finding a bug in rad in the process).

Many thanks, Axel!

-Greg

···

From: Axel Jacobs <[email protected]>
Date: December 1, 2013 2:06:39 PM PST

Dear list,

this might be of interest to rad-openstudio, but I am refraining from cross-posting.

Whilst doing a bit of Radiance teaching last Friday, I got caught red-face in my attempt to use objview.rb. Installing ruby.zip from the NREL web site (and making sure %PATH% picks it up) did not help--objview.rb kept complaining about missing input files. It appears that somehow, ARGV is completely ignored by the parser once the options are dealt with. However, I know little about Ruby.

Since I need a working objview next Friday, I finished the re-write of objview in Perl, which I started some time ago, but never polished off.

Whilst at it, I also completed a Perl port of objpict.csh.

Both appear to work under LINUX and Windows Vista. Zip archive with Windows exe files is here:
http://www.jaloxa.eu/pickup/win_objpict_objview.zip

Your feedback would be much appreciated.

Since the Windows objview.rb has some extra functionality over the UNIX csh version (namely ltview), I started work on a x-plat ltview.pl, but have I admit that I'm not sure what it is meant to do:

a) if ltview is meant to show the actual luminaire (or fixture for you non-Europeans), then are not objview or objpict good enough?

b) if, on the other hand, it is the actual photometric distribution that matters, then would it not be better to extract the dat file of the distribution, and suspend a little disk or square with that distribution applied to it. The command line parser could then be extended to
- include an option that might cause it to put the disk inside a sphere rather than a box; and/or
- render a -vta fisheye view from just below this disk, so that the entire photometric distribution might be appreciated.

I'm happy enough to look into this if it is felt that the Windows version of objview and the 'official' one should be based on the same code. Would need some guidance, though as to what ltview should do.

Good night and good luck

Axel

PS: I'd love to call it 'iesview', but this name is already taken by an add-on to AGI32. Works pretty well, actually (under Windows).
@Ian, we probably have to thank you for this little gem?

_______________________________________________
Radiance-dev mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-dev

Thanks, Greg,

I am humbled by your faith in my apprentice Perl wizardry. The proof of the pudding will be this Friday, when I'm giving another Radiance class. I'll let you know if things do not go according to plan.

Best

Axel

···

On 04/12/13 20:09, Gregory J. Ward wrote:

Since this is automatically an improvement over the existing shell scripts, I've gone ahead and checked your new objpict.pl and objview.pl into the CVS HEAD. I did a couple of checks to make sure they worked as advertised (finding a bug in rad in the process).

Many thanks, Axel!

-Greg

From: Axel Jacobs <[email protected]>
Date: December 1, 2013 2:06:39 PM PST

Dear list,

this might be of interest to rad-openstudio, but I am refraining from cross-posting.

Whilst doing a bit of Radiance teaching last Friday, I got caught red-face in my attempt to use objview.rb. Installing ruby.zip from the NREL web site (and making sure %PATH% picks it up) did not help--objview.rb kept complaining about missing input files. It appears that somehow, ARGV is completely ignored by the parser once the options are dealt with. However, I know little about Ruby.

Since I need a working objview next Friday, I finished the re-write of objview in Perl, which I started some time ago, but never polished off.

Whilst at it, I also completed a Perl port of objpict.csh.

Both appear to work under LINUX and Windows Vista. Zip archive with Windows exe files is here:
http://www.jaloxa.eu/pickup/win_objpict_objview.zip

Your feedback would be much appreciated.

Since the Windows objview.rb has some extra functionality over the UNIX csh version (namely ltview), I started work on a x-plat ltview.pl, but have I admit that I'm not sure what it is meant to do:

a) if ltview is meant to show the actual luminaire (or fixture for you non-Europeans), then are not objview or objpict good enough?

b) if, on the other hand, it is the actual photometric distribution that matters, then would it not be better to extract the dat file of the distribution, and suspend a little disk or square with that distribution applied to it. The command line parser could then be extended to
- include an option that might cause it to put the disk inside a sphere rather than a box; and/or
- render a -vta fisheye view from just below this disk, so that the entire photometric distribution might be appreciated.

I'm happy enough to look into this if it is felt that the Windows version of objview and the 'official' one should be based on the same code. Would need some guidance, though as to what ltview should do.

Good night and good luck

Axel

PS: I'd love to call it 'iesview', but this name is already taken by an add-on to AGI32. Works pretty well, actually (under Windows).
@Ian, we probably have to thank you for this little gem?

_______________________________________________
Radiance-dev mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-dev

_______________________________________________
Radiance-dev mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-dev