HDR display options

Hi,

I am wondering what devices people are currently using to display HDR imaging data. Some may have seen the light box developed to display the Radiance renderings of Hagia Sophia (presented on the Radiance workshops). That is a rather static approach fitting to exactly one image, made for exhibitions, but less useful for displaying changing content. I am aware of techniques based on custom-made projector setups and some few commercial products. Still I wonder whether anyone here actually has experience with a commercial product or did some custom setup which does not require rocket-science skills or gigantic bank account…

Some displays I found:

Dolby reference display, mostly for color, no info on dynamic range, based on brightside displays:
http://www.dolby.com/us/en/professional/hardware/video-monitors/prm-4200-professional-reference-monitor.html

I heard rumors that these achieve up to 1:200,000 contrast…

Cheers, Lars.

Hi Lars,

Since I work for Dolby and helped develop the BrightSide display, I suppose I should offer something here. The Dolby professional reference monitor offers sequential contrast that is at least 200,000:1, but simultaneous contrast is less than this. As you say, this display is more targeted at markets more concerned with accurate color reproduction and wide gamut, such as the film post-production industry.

I don't know if they sell it anymore, but Sim2 also had a display based on BrightSide's technology:

  http://www.engadget.com/2009/02/03/sim2-solar-series-infinite-contrast-hdr-lcd-ships-in-q2/

I believe Toshiba and Samsung also used the technology (though illegally) in their locally dimmed LED+LCD displays. I don't know which models or how capable the inputs are.

Unfortunately, it's a bit of a waiting game right now for this technology to reach the consumer market. We have some things in the works, as do others, but I couldn't tell you any details even if I had them.

Various researchers have built their own systems by combining a DLP projector with an LCD display with it's backlight "hinged" out of the way, a la the original paper by Seetzen et al:

Seetzen, Helge, W. Heidrich, W. Stuezlinger, G. Ward, L. Whitehead, M. Trentacoste, A. Ghosh, A. Vorozcovs, "High Dynamic Range Display Systems," ACM Trans. Graph. (special issue SIGGRAPH 2004), August 2004.

For my own use, I still have the HDR viewer I made over a decade ago:

Ward, Greg, "A Wide Field, High Dynamic Range, Stereographic Viewer," Proceedings of PICS 2002, April 2002.

By far the easiest (and cheapest) solution for still images is to print out a grayscale version of the square root of your image (with maximum normalized to 1.0) as described in the above paper, but as a large-format print. I would make this one the image with exaggerated contrast, since you can print it at high-resolution. Then, project the original image divided by this grayscale image using a standard DLP or LCD projector -- preferably a bright one although it doesn't need to be high-resolution, onto this print. Line it up, and violá! You have a high-resolution, high dynamic range still image. There's no way to make it move, sadly.

-Greg

···

From: "Lars O. Grobe" <[email protected]>
Date: June 1, 2012 12:41:32 AM PDT

Hi,

I am wondering what devices people are currently using to display HDR imaging data. Some may have seen the light box developed to display the Radiance renderings of Hagia Sophia (presented on the Radiance workshops). That is a rather static approach fitting to exactly one image, made for exhibitions, but less useful for displaying changing content. I am aware of techniques based on custom-made projector setups and some few commercial products. Still I wonder whether anyone here actually has experience with a commercial product or did some custom setup which does not require rocket-science skills or gigantic bank account…

Some displays I found:

Dolby reference display, mostly for color, no info on dynamic range, based on brightside displays:
http://www.dolby.com/us/en/professional/hardware/video-monitors/prm-4200-professional-reference-monitor.html

I heard rumors that these achieve up to 1:200,000 contrast…

Cheers, Lars.

I think sim2 is still a valuable option:
http://www.sim2.com/HDR/corporate/about_sim2
G

···

On 1 Jun 2012, at 15:54, Gregory J. Ward wrote:

Hi Lars,

Since I work for Dolby and helped develop the BrightSide display, I suppose I should offer something here. The Dolby professional reference monitor offers sequential contrast that is at least 200,000:1, but simultaneous contrast is less than this. As you say, this display is more targeted at markets more concerned with accurate color reproduction and wide gamut, such as the film post-production industry.

I don't know if they sell it anymore, but Sim2 also had a display based on BrightSide's technology:

  http://www.engadget.com/2009/02/03/sim2-solar-series-infinite-contrast-hdr-lcd-ships-in-q2/

I believe Toshiba and Samsung also used the technology (though illegally) in their locally dimmed LED+LCD displays. I don't know which models or how capable the inputs are.

Unfortunately, it's a bit of a waiting game right now for this technology to reach the consumer market. We have some things in the works, as do others, but I couldn't tell you any details even if I had them.

Various researchers have built their own systems by combining a DLP projector with an LCD display with it's backlight "hinged" out of the way, a la the original paper by Seetzen et al:

Seetzen, Helge, W. Heidrich, W. Stuezlinger, G. Ward, L. Whitehead, M. Trentacoste, A. Ghosh, A. Vorozcovs, "High Dynamic Range Display Systems," ACM Trans. Graph. (special issue SIGGRAPH 2004), August 2004.

For my own use, I still have the HDR viewer I made over a decade ago:

Ward, Greg, "A Wide Field, High Dynamic Range, Stereographic Viewer," Proceedings of PICS 2002, April 2002.

By far the easiest (and cheapest) solution for still images is to print out a grayscale version of the square root of your image (with maximum normalized to 1.0) as described in the above paper, but as a large-format print. I would make this one the image with exaggerated contrast, since you can print it at high-resolution. Then, project the original image divided by this grayscale image using a standard DLP or LCD projector -- preferably a bright one although it doesn't need to be high-resolution, onto this print. Line it up, and violá! You have a high-resolution, high dynamic range still image. There's no way to make it move, sadly.

-Greg

From: "Lars O. Grobe" <[email protected]>
Date: June 1, 2012 12:41:32 AM PDT

Hi,

I am wondering what devices people are currently using to display HDR imaging data. Some may have seen the light box developed to display the Radiance renderings of Hagia Sophia (presented on the Radiance workshops). That is a rather static approach fitting to exactly one image, made for exhibitions, but less useful for displaying changing content. I am aware of techniques based on custom-made projector setups and some few commercial products. Still I wonder whether anyone here actually has experience with a commercial product or did some custom setup which does not require rocket-science skills or gigantic bank account…

Some displays I found:

Dolby reference display, mostly for color, no info on dynamic range, based on brightside displays:
http://www.dolby.com/us/en/professional/hardware/video-monitors/prm-4200-professional-reference-monitor.html

I heard rumors that these achieve up to 1:200,000 contrast…

Cheers, Lars.

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