can't get the PATH, RAYPATH and MANPATH set correctly

Having Radiance in /usr/local/bin as well as /usr/local/radiance/bin can be problematic, even with a tightly configured environment. Your initial change to .profile *should* have worked though, i.e., "which gensky" should have found the one in /usr/local/radiance/bin. My guess is you didn't source ~/.profile or start a new terminal window before trying the "which" command. Or maybe the order the way you have it there is wrong. Personally I start with the existing path and append /usr/local/radiance/bin to that. I'm with Ehsan, you may want to start clean (unfortunately there's no clean way to uninstall Radiance), reinstall, and add the following to your environment (personally I make these changes to ~/.bash_profile):

## Radiance path crap
export PATH=$PATH:.:/usr/local/radiance/bin
export RAYPATH=.:/usr/local/radiance/lib
export MANPATH=$MANPATH:/usr/local/radiance/doc

HTH
- Rob

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On 10/23/14, 7:24 AM, "Ehsan M.Vazifeh" <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:

I guess its better to cleanup all the radiance files from bin and install it from scratch! I assume you used the link below:
http://www.radiance-online.org/download-install/installation-information

Hope this help.

Bests,
Ehsan

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 3:17 PM, Joe Smith <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:
Hi, Ehsan, yes, I also tried using "sudo pico ~/.profile", but the problem is still the same:

No feedback when I typied "which gensky" in terminal, although it is in the folder /usr/local/radiance/bin ...

Any advices?

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 9:03 PM, Ehsan Vazifeh <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:
Hi,

I guess you should use sudo before pico. cuz without sudo you cant save the .profile

Cheers,
Ehsan

On 23 Oct 2014, at 14:56, Joe Smith <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:

Hi, I don't seem to be able to get the my Radiance environment variable set correctly after the following steps:

1. install the latest Radiance 4.2.1 for Mac which is installed to the /usr/local/radiance folder.

2. use "pico ~/.profile" to edit .profile and add the following lines:
export PATH=/usr/local/radiance/bin:$PATH
export RAYPATH=.:/usr/local/radiance/lib
export MANPATH=/usr/local/radiance/man

However, when I type "which gensky" in the terminal, it still points me to the path of gensky in a different location: "/usr/local/bin" where copies of some Radiance programs are put previously.

I wonder why the editing of .profile didn't work in this case even if I restarted my computer ...

So, can I have some advices on how to:
1. clear up earlier copies of Radiance programs
2. do a clean installation of Radiance
3. and set its environmental variables correctly?

Thanks!

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Also for troubleshooting try the command "type -a gensky" to show not just the path to which version of the executable floats to the top of your PATH variable, but will show all the locations of the executable in any possible paths defined in PATH. As Rob said, your PATH variable may be out of order and it's finding the one you don't want first.

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Thanks for this, Chris! Didn't know about this "type" command.

- Rob

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On 10/23/14, 9:22 AM, "Christopher Rush" <[email protected]> wrote:

Also for troubleshooting try the command "type -a gensky" to show not
just the path to which version of the executable floats to the top of
your PATH variable, but will show all the locations of the executable in
any possible paths defined in PATH.