rholo?

Radiance as such works with any graphics card, or even without one.
If you plan on using rholo, then hardware OpenGL acceleration may be
desirable. On Linux, this is acheived either through the X11 server
or directly through the mesa library.

what is rholo?

-jacqueline

Jacqueline Snyder wrote:

> Radiance as such works with any graphics card, or even without one.
> If you plan on using rholo, then hardware OpenGL acceleration may be
> desirable. On Linux, this is acheived either through the X11 server
> or directly through the mesa library.

what is rholo?

rholo is the most interactive rendering program within
Radiance so far:

http://radsite.lbl.gov/radiance/man_html/rholo.1.html

-schorsch

···

--
Georg Mischler -- simulations developer -- schorsch at schorsch com
+schorsch.com+ -- lighting design tools -- http://www.schorsch.com/

Please, would people talk about about their experiences using rholo? With enough preparation, can it be used for real-time walkthroughs as the name suggests? What type of computer would a I need to do it--would a 400 MHz PowerMac G4 with a Radeon 9000 card do?

How *much* rendering time would it need to cover, say, the level of a detail of a half-inch physical model of a 1200 ft^2 gallery? (For SI users: 1:20 scale, about 100 m^2) (How much modelling time would it take me to finish that, I wonder? Ulp!)

Randolph

It's really difficult to answer these sorts of questions -- you just have to try it and see if it works for you. The rendering time as always depends on your settings -- interreflections, etc. A PowerMac G4 with a Radeon 9000 card should work fine. Be sure to use the X11 server from Apple, as it supports OpenGL fairly well. That way, you can use the -o ogl driver.

-Greg

···

From: Randolph Fritz <[email protected]>
Date: Sun May 4, 2003 3:26:39 PM US/Pacific
To: [email protected]
Subject: [Radiance-general] rholo?
Reply-To: [email protected]

Please, would people talk about about their experiences using rholo? With enough preparation, can it be used for real-time walkthroughs as the name suggests? What type of computer would a I need to do it--would a 400 MHz PowerMac G4 with a Radeon 9000 card do?

How *much* rendering time would it need to cover, say, the level of a detail of a half-inch physical model of a 1200 ft^2 gallery? (For SI users: 1:20 scale, about 100 m^2) (How much modelling time would it take me to finish that, I wonder? Ulp!)

Randolph

Thanks!

If I do this at all, I will do as much pre-rendering as I can on the fastest system I can fine (which isn't my Mac.) Is there a sample .hdk file I can download for testing display?

Randolph

···

On Monday, May 12, 2003, at 11:54 AM, Greg Ward wrote:

It's really difficult to answer these sorts of questions -- you just have to try it and see if it works for you. The rendering time as always depends on your settings -- interreflections, etc. A PowerMac G4 with a Radeon 9000 card should work fine. Be sure to use the X11 server from Apple, as it supports OpenGL fairly well. That way, you can use the -o ogl driver.

Randolph Fritz wrote:

If I do this at all, I will do as much pre-rendering as I can on the fastest system I can fine (which isn't my Mac.) Is there a sample .hdk file I can download for testing display?

Have a look in ray/obj/cabin, there are a couple of samples using the cabin model. There are makefiles for a day and night scene, running 'make nholo' at the command line will start an interactive process of the nighttime scene for example.

···

----

      Rob Guglielmetti

e. [email protected]
w. www.rumblestrip.org

I tried it; performance is quite respectable on the fast Pentium 4 in the Baker Lighting Lab. Navigation, however, is difficult enough that I think I won't be using it for this project; I don't want to try to teach people how to use it under fire. (I don't think I want to learn how for this project, either!) Maybe next time...

By the way, what is the difference between the glx and ogl drivers?

Randolph

···

On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 03:02 PM, Rob Guglielmetti wrote:

If I do this at all, I will do as much pre-rendering as I can on the fastest system I can fine (which isn't my Mac.) Is there a sample .hdk file I can download for testing display?

Have a look in ray/obj/cabin, there are a couple of samples using the cabin model. There are makefiles for a day and night scene, running 'make nholo' at the command line will start an interactive process of the nighttime scene for example.

From: Randolph Fritz <[email protected]>

If I do this at all, I will do as much pre-rendering as I can on the fastest system I can fine (which isn't my Mac.) Is there a sample .hdk file I can download for testing display?

Have a look in ray/obj/cabin, there are a couple of samples using the cabin model. There are makefiles for a day and night scene, running 'make nholo' at the command line will start an interactive process of the nighttime scene for example.

I tried it; performance is quite respectable on the fast Pentium 4 in the Baker Lighting Lab. Navigation, however, is difficult enough that I think I won't be using it for this project; I don't want to try to teach people how to use it under fire. (I don't think I want to learn how for this project, either!) Maybe next time...

It takes a bit of getting used to, no question. If you have a fast OpenGL implementation, you'll suffer from a bug in the official 3.5 version that causes rotation to spin wildly, which is fixed on top of trunk. (I thought it was fixed in the 3.5 release, but I missed a zero on the delay time I added between refreshes.) Once you're used to it, though, you'll find rview painful by comparison.

By the way, what is the difference between the glx and ogl drivers?

The glx1 driver is an older version of the ogl driver, which doesn't render the scene geometry and use it to reduce multidepth sampling errors. (You'll have to read the holodeck paper to know what I'm talking about -- I just added it to radsite at <http://radsite.lbl.gov/radiance/papers>.) There's also a "glx" driver that doesn't get built by default as it appears to be broken. It draws a Gouraud-shaded triangle mesh instead of the Vornoi regions of the ogl and glx1 drivers.

-Greg

···

On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 03:02 PM, Rob Guglielmetti wrote:

From: Randolph Fritz <[email protected]>

If I do this at all, I will do as much pre-rendering as I can on the fastest system I can fine (which isn't my Mac.) Is there a sample .hdk file I can download for testing display?

Have a look in ray/obj/cabin, there are a couple of samples using the cabin model. There are makefiles for a day and night scene, running 'make nholo' at the command line will start an interactive process of the nighttime scene for example.

I tried it; performance is quite respectable on the fast Pentium 4 in the Baker Lighting Lab. Navigation, however, is difficult enough that I think I won't be using it for this project; I don't want to try to teach people how to use it under fire. (I don't think I want to learn how for this project, either!) Maybe next time...

It takes a bit of getting used to, no question. If you have a fast OpenGL implementation, you'll suffer from a bug in the official 3.5 version that causes rotation to spin wildly, which is fixed on top of trunk. (I thought it was fixed in the 3.5 release, but I missed a zero on the delay time I added between refreshes.) Once you're used to it, though, you'll find rview painful by comparison.

Thanks--I'll give it another try, then, but I'm not going to hand the mouse to a reviewer; they'd just go bonkers. To my frustration, this whole issue of presentation of computer models turns out to be terribly difficult. I think rholo is a good part of the answer; a constraint-based navigator built around some computer game controls--to keep one from flying through walls and getting lost in space--would probably satisfy the need.

By the way, what is the difference between the glx and ogl drivers?

The glx1 driver is an older version of the ogl driver, [...]

oh, I see. Thanks.

Randolph

···

On Wednesday, May 14, 2003, at 10:05 PM, Greg Ward wrote:

On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, at 03:02 PM, Rob Guglielmetti wrote: