Rendering Exclude Options - follow up

Greg,

Thanks for the heads up. The logic looks very sound, and I got as far as
stage 3, when it barfed at -lw as a bad option. This I assume means that
I don’t have the latest version that includes Rob's option. The
difficulty at this stage is that I am running it under Cygwin and am not
confident about compiling it.

However, will try compliling the latest release on one of the mac's in
the office and see how I get on - however for now I have another
deadline looming. Many thanks though as I suspect your solution does
exactly what I wanted. GREAT!!

Nick

···

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of
[email protected]
Sent: None
To: [email protected]
Subject: Radiance-general Digest, Vol 8, Issue 13

Send Radiance-general mailing list submissions to
  [email protected]

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
  http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
  [email protected]

You can reach the person managing the list at
  [email protected]

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of Radiance-general digest..."

Today's Topics:

   1. python / shell scripting radiance (Jelle Feringa // EZCT / Paris)
   2. Re: python / shell scripting radiance (iebele)
   3. Re: Rendering exclude options (Greg Ward)
   4. Re: Rendering exclude options (Rob Guglielmetti)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2004 12:27:47 +0200
From: "Jelle Feringa // EZCT / Paris" <[email protected]>
Subject: [Radiance-general] python / shell scripting radiance
To: <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Somewhat off-topic, but maybe a relevant curiosity;

I'm just starting to script/extend radiance using python (win32). I'm
interested whether other people are using radiance in this way -I
suppose so, I'm sure Georg Mischler has extensive experience- Is anyone
aware of python/radiance scripts available online, or could point me in
the direction of specific python/radiance content available online
(perhaps willing to share?). My interest is mostly automating rendering
tasks. From that I intend to see whether it could be interesting to
combine genetic algorithms with radiance to automate architectural
research. I have
-modest- experience in computing this way, but initial research focused
on GA/FEM simulation. An example of such an experiment would be to
parameterize a window, the placement of the window, or the material in
the room, and to search for a solution -using a GA- where there would be
a constant luminance in the room. In order to conduct these experiments
I first need to progress in automating rendering tasks.

Cheers!

JF
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL:
http://radiance-online.org/pipermail/radiance-general/attachments/200410
26/8a0a2201/attachment.html

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2004 14:26:17 +0200
From: iebele <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] python / shell scripting radiance
To: Radiance general discussion <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

He Jelle!,

First, what do you mean with GA/FEM ?

I do not know anything of Phyton, but I have heard of this:

Blender3d works with Python, and also an export to Radiance seems to be
available.
Blender should be able to create booleans too, you will need that if you

intend to create parametric windows.
If both is true, you just have to dig in Blender's source to find out
how you can benefit.
The sourcecode of Blender is free. You can download it from
www.blender3d.org

Some blender developpers are Dutch, that also might be easy for you.

Iebele

Jelle Feringa // EZCT / Paris wrote:

Somewhat off-topic, but maybe a relevant curiosity;

I'm just starting to script/extend radiance using python (win32).

I'm interested whether other people are using radiance in this way -I
suppose so, I'm sure Georg Mischler has extensive experience-

Is anyone aware of python/radiance scripts available online, or could
point me in the direction of specific python/radiance content
available online (perhaps willing to share?). My interest is mostly
automating rendering tasks. From that I intend to see whether it could

be interesting to combine genetic algorithms with radiance to automate

architectural research. I have -modest- experience in computing this
way, but initial research focused on GA/FEM simulation. An example of
such an experiment would be to parameterize a window, the placement of

the window, or the material in the room, and to search for a solution
-using a GA- where there would be a constant luminance in the room. In

order to conduct these experiments I first need to progress in
automating rendering tasks.

Cheers!

JF

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
-

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list [email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL:
http://radiance-online.org/pipermail/radiance-general/attachments/200410
26/aab8c1c1/attachment-0001.html

------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2004 08:43:40 -0700
From: Greg Ward <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] Rendering exclude options
To: Radiance general discussion <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=WINDOWS-1252; format=flowed

Hi Nick,

You should be able to do what you want using pinterp and falsecolor.
I'll assume that you desire isolux contours on vertical surfaces in my
instructions, below.

1) Generate an irradiance image using a parallel view to render the
vertical surfaces you are interested in with the -i option. This will
exclude surfaces perpendicular (horizontal surfaces in particular), but
may include surfaces at odd angles. Hopefully, this is OK. At the
same time, you should use the -z option of rpict to create a z-buffer
to go with your rendering, and set -pj 0. Let's call this
"irradiance.pic", and call the z-buffer "irradiance.zbf".

2) Generate a standard image of the same size but without the -i or -z
options. (Actually, you may use the -z option with either rendering --
you just don't need it for both as it will be the same.) Again, set
-pj 0 as before, so your pixels line up. Let's call this
"standard.pic". You will probably want to pass this image through
pcomb or pfilt to optimize the exposure for display, but don't alter
the resolution or the z-buffer won't be valid.

3) Run these two renderings through falsecolor to generate a contour
plot, using Rob Guglielmetti's new -lw option to set the label width to
0. You must do this in a special way to preserve the view string
needed in Step 5:

  % getinfo < standard.pic | grep '^VIEW=' > contour.pic
  % falsecolor -cl -lw 0 -i irradiance.pic -p standard.pic [other
options] >> contour.pic

4) Generate a standard image from the view you actually want to see,
which I'll assume is either a perspective view or one coming from a
different angle to include some vertical surfaces. You must also
generate a z-buffer for this image using rpict's -z option. Let's call
this "view.pic", and the z-buffer "view.zbf". You will probably want
to pass this image through pcomb or pfilt to optimize the exposure for
display, but follow the same procedure as in Step 2.

5) Use pinterp to combine the two images, giving the contour image
first and using the -q option to avoid averaging:

  % pinterp -x 1024 -y 1024 -q -f0 -vf view.pic contour.pic
irradiance.zbf view.pic view.zbf > combined.pic

The -x 1024 -y 1024 options are to set the output resolution, which
should match the resolutions of the input images. If you want to
produce an anti-aliased result, then go through with resolutions that
are twice or three times what you desire in the end, then pass
"combined.pic" through pfilt with options to filter down the result.
Any filtering earlier in the pipeline will break everything.

I hope this works -- let me know how it turns out. (And you thought it
was a simple question!)

-Greg

From: "Nick Devlin" <[email protected]>
Date: October 26, 2004 1:41:14 AM PDT

Dear All,

A simple question – I suspect to the more able (then me) of you out
there
. Is it possible to exclude planes in a certain orientations from
an rpict calculation. For example, I would like to use radiance to
create a picture showing the vertical sky component on vertical
surfaces. Therefore I would like to exclude the horizontal surfaces to
prevent them from cluttering up the image.

Ideally, I would anticipate being able to overlay a contour image which
excludes the horizontal surfaces over a luminance image which includes
them. I suppose I could generate this from two separate sets of
geometry, but this is a little clunky and may result in some inaccurate
results, where the inter-reflections may be important and or
significant. Any thoughts would be gratefully received.

Many thanks

Nick

XCO2 conisbee Ltd
1-5 Offord Street
London N1 1DH
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7700 1000
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7700 4455
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.xco2.com

  engineering sustainability

------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2004 12:18:45 -0400
From: Rob Guglielmetti <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] Rendering exclude options
To: Radiance general discussion <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed

Greg Ward wrote:

I hope this works -- let me know how it turns out. (And you thought
it
was a simple question!)

Damn, my head just exploded.

These recipes you come up with are just too cool, Greg. And I'm not
just saying that because I have no head at the moment. I should collect

these tips into a little "cookbook", for the unix pipeline-challenged,
like myself. Examples like these really illustrate the power and
enormous flexibility of Radiance!

----

      Rob Guglielmetti

e. [email protected]
w. www.rumblestrip.org

------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list [email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

End of Radiance-general Digest, Vol 8, Issue 13
***********************************************

Nick Devlin wrote:

Greg,

Thanks for the heads up. The logic looks very sound, and I got as far as
stage 3, when it barfed at -lw as a bad option. This I assume means that
I don’t have the latest version that includes Rob's option. The
difficulty at this stage is that I am running it under Cygwin and am not
confident about compiling it.

The good news is that falsecolor is really just a shell script -- no compiling necessary. I've attached a copy of falsecolor from my computer, which has the -lw & -lh options. Place this in your bin directory -- or wherever you installed the radiance binaries -- and you should be good to go. (make sure you reset the permissions to make it executable.)

falsecolor (4.17 KB)

···

----

      Rob Guglielmetti

e. [email protected]
w. www.rumblestrip.org