Newbie Install Question

Hello all,

Sorry but I have a basic install question.

I am trying to install radiance on my Apple Powerbook running 10.4.10 and everything I read talks about a directory "/usr/local/lib" however there is no local directory in my usr directory. Should I simply make one?

I have been working mainly from the instructions I found here:
http://www.designcommunity.com/forum/8756.html
they were the best/simplest directions I could quickly find online.

Thanks!

Hello all,

Sorry but I have a basic install question.

I am trying to install radiance on my Apple Powerbook running 10.4.10 and everything I read talks about a directory "/usr/local/lib" however there is no local directory in my usr directory. Should I simply make one?

Yes. Just go on and create '/usr/local/' and all the directories that might be
required below that (although I think they will be created automatically by the
installer if necessary). These are '/usr/local/lib', '/usr/local/bin' and
'/usr/local/man'.

'/usr/local' was traditionally the place were software was installed by the
administrator. OS X doesn't need it and Apple doesn't expect their type of
customer to fiddle with the file system; so they don't provide it out of the
box. But it won't hurt your system.

I have been working mainly from the instructions I found here:
http://www.designcommunity.com/forum/8756.html
they were the best/simplest directions I could quickly find online.

Simple indeed but not particularly admin-friendly. You will end up with a
system that mixes the system binaries with the Radiance specific files.

And as I just realised the current download from http://radsite.lbl.gov/radiance
does not include all the files, only the binaries. Following the above instructions
would result in an error message after the first 'cd ...' command.

If you are familiar with Linux or another Unix system and think you can
compile the whole think yourself I would recommend you to do that. Read
the README file in the source distribution, run the 'makeall' command
and everything will be installed for you. You have to install the developer
tools for OS X first, though (2nd CD iirc or download the updated version
from the web).

If you want to go with the binaries you still have to download the source
to get the various other files the installation instructions mention.
I would copy the binaries to /usr/local/bin and set the $PATH variable
to include that in your search path. I have modified the instructions from
the web page for that:

STEP 2:

sudo mkdir /usr/local
sudo mkdir /usr/local/bin
cd rad3R8_macosx
sudo cp * /usr/local/bin

Whenever you use the sudo command (superuser do) you will NOT be asked for the password
you just set for root. You will be asked for YOUR password (once for a certain period of
time - a few minutes, usually) and you will be allowed to continue with proper rights
only if you have set up yourself as an administrative user
("System Panel -> Accounts -> Allow user to administer this computer"). If you are
root there is no point in using 'sudo'.
Use the sudo command with care. There is no limit to the damage you can cause with this omnipotent command.

You will get an error about dev being a directory, so it wasn't copied. This is fine.

Step 3 Install standard libraries

···

On 5 Aug 2007, at 21:17, Sean Smallman wrote:
---------------------------------

Now do the following:

-> Download and unpack source distribution from the above website. I will assume the directory created is called 'ray' and it's in your home directory

cd ~/ray

mkdir /usr/local/lib
sudo mv lib /usr/local/lib/ray

cd ~/ray/src/rt
sudo cp rayinit.cal /usr/local/lib/ray

cd ~/ray/src/gen
sudo cp *cal /usr/local/lib/ray

At this point you have a functional standard Radiance installation.

The last to steps

sudo mkdir /usr/tmp
sudo chmod 777 /usr/tmp

are not necessary any more. You can install the manual pages, too:

sudo mkdir /usr/local/man

cd ~/ray/doc/man

sudo cp * /usr/local/man

I'm not sure /usr/local/man is included in the search path of the man command, though.

After installing into '/usr/local/' you have to change the '$PATH' setting
of your shell to include that directory structure into the search path - in
particular the '/usr/local/bin' directory. You should find a line that starts
with $PATH in the '/etc/profile' file. Make a copy of that file before you
change it so you can go back to the original version. Change the line to

PATH="/usr/local/bin:/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin"
export PATH

Finally you can set the RAYPATH environment variable (in the same file):

RAYPATH=".:/usr/local/lib/ray"
export RAYPATH

(I can't find this set on my system and yet all that I do with Radiance
works fine.)

This sets the environment for commands typed in the terminal application.
It's only active after you start a new terminal session or type
'bash -login' in your current terminal. This is a good way to find out
if everything is right.

Now you really should have a functional Radiance installation.

Cheers,
Thomas

Thanks a lot Tom!

I believe everything is working, I just need to get my files from class to actually check it all out.

Thanks a lot for taking the time to spell everything out, it really made everything easy for someone who is very new to playing around in the terminal.

Thanks!

-Sean

···

On Aug 5, 2007, at 6:48 PM, Thomas Bleicher wrote:

On 5 Aug 2007, at 21:17, Sean Smallman wrote:

Hello all,

Sorry but I have a basic install question.

I am trying to install radiance on my Apple Powerbook running 10.4.10 and everything I read talks about a directory "/usr/local/lib" however there is no local directory in my usr directory. Should I simply make one?

Yes. Just go on and create '/usr/local/' and all the directories that might be
required below that (although I think they will be created automatically by the
installer if necessary). These are '/usr/local/lib', '/usr/local/bin' and
'/usr/local/man'.

'/usr/local' was traditionally the place were software was installed by the
administrator. OS X doesn't need it and Apple doesn't expect their type of
customer to fiddle with the file system; so they don't provide it out of the
box. But it won't hurt your system.

I have been working mainly from the instructions I found here:
http://www.designcommunity.com/forum/8756.html
they were the best/simplest directions I could quickly find online.

Simple indeed but not particularly admin-friendly. You will end up with a
system that mixes the system binaries with the Radiance specific files.

And as I just realised the current download from http://radsite.lbl.gov/radiance
does not include all the files, only the binaries. Following the above instructions
would result in an error message after the first 'cd ...' command.

If you are familiar with Linux or another Unix system and think you can
compile the whole think yourself I would recommend you to do that. Read
the README file in the source distribution, run the 'makeall' command
and everything will be installed for you. You have to install the developer
tools for OS X first, though (2nd CD iirc or download the updated version
from the web).

If you want to go with the binaries you still have to download the source
to get the various other files the installation instructions mention.
I would copy the binaries to /usr/local/bin and set the $PATH variable
to include that in your search path. I have modified the instructions from
the web page for that:

STEP 2:

sudo mkdir /usr/local
sudo mkdir /usr/local/bin
cd rad3R8_macosx
sudo cp * /usr/local/bin

Whenever you use the sudo command (superuser do) you will NOT be asked for the password
you just set for root. You will be asked for YOUR password (once for a certain period of
time - a few minutes, usually) and you will be allowed to continue with proper rights
only if you have set up yourself as an administrative user
("System Panel -> Accounts -> Allow user to administer this computer"). If you are
root there is no point in using 'sudo'.
Use the sudo command with care. There is no limit to the damage you can cause with this omnipotent command.

You will get an error about dev being a directory, so it wasn't copied. This is fine.

Step 3 Install standard libraries
---------------------------------

Now do the following:

-> Download and unpack source distribution from the above website. I will assume the directory created is called 'ray' and it's in your home directory

cd ~/ray

mkdir /usr/local/lib
sudo mv lib /usr/local/lib/ray

cd ~/ray/src/rt
sudo cp rayinit.cal /usr/local/lib/ray

cd ~/ray/src/gen
sudo cp *cal /usr/local/lib/ray

At this point you have a functional standard Radiance installation.

The last to steps

sudo mkdir /usr/tmp
sudo chmod 777 /usr/tmp

are not necessary any more. You can install the manual pages, too:

sudo mkdir /usr/local/man

cd ~/ray/doc/man

sudo cp * /usr/local/man

I'm not sure /usr/local/man is included in the search path of the man command, though.

After installing into '/usr/local/' you have to change the '$PATH' setting
of your shell to include that directory structure into the search path - in
particular the '/usr/local/bin' directory. You should find a line that starts
with $PATH in the '/etc/profile' file. Make a copy of that file before you
change it so you can go back to the original version. Change the line to

PATH="/usr/local/bin:/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin"
export PATH

Finally you can set the RAYPATH environment variable (in the same file):

RAYPATH=".:/usr/local/lib/ray"
export RAYPATH

(I can't find this set on my system and yet all that I do with Radiance
works fine.)

This sets the environment for commands typed in the terminal application.
It's only active after you start a new terminal session or type
'bash -login' in your current terminal. This is a good way to find out
if everything is right.

Now you really should have a functional Radiance installation.

Cheers,
Thomas

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