creating a new luminaire in Desktop radiance from a rad and dat file only

Thank you for the information Krzystof.

Can anyone tell me how to synchronise a luminaries in desktop radiance 2?
and how to create an IES file from a .rad and .dat file for a given lamp
using unix radiance?

Best Regards,

Anthony

···

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]]On Behalf Of
[email protected]
Sent: 01 July 2004 20:06
To: [email protected]
Subject: Radiance-general Digest, Vol 5, Issue 3

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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of Radiance-general digest..."

Today's Topics:

   1. Re: RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data (Krzysztof Wandachowicz)
   2. RE: RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data (Martin Moeck)
   3. windows: illum useage? (Lars O. Grobe)
   4. Re: colorpict and materials (Lars O. Grobe)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 16:29:19 +0200
From: "Krzysztof Wandachowicz" <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data
To: "Radiance general discussion"
  <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"

You can find prepared files for incandescent lamp with clear bulb. The
only thing you should change is luminous flux in klm, because these
files are prepared for 100W lamp. Change the line "3 1.35 1.35 1.35" in
z100p.rad file for "3 0.71 0.71 0.71".

You can find these files at:
http://lumen.iee.put.poznan.pl/kw/oprawy/z100p.rad
http://lumen.iee.put.poznan.pl/kw/oprawy/z100p.dat

Descriptions are in polish because these materials I've prepared are for
my students.
z100p.rad includes all information about lamp, this lamp is assumed as
small sphere 0.01 radius.
z100p.dat includes information about light distribution of 100W
incandescent lamp.

You have to use Radiance instead of Desktop Radiance to prepare
calculation.

Good luck!

Krzysztof.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony J. Farrell" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 1:42 PM
Subject: [Radiance-general] RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data

I am currently carrying out basic validation techniques of the Radiance
software using a black box and standard 60Watt bulb therein.

I cannot locate a standard incandescent 60W bulb (just bare hung from
ceiling, no lamp shade) on the desktop radiance program.

Can anyone help me by way of an add on file for a standard light bulb

(even

if not 60W!) or refer me to a suitable IESNA file?

Kind regards

Anthony

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]]On Behalf Of
[email protected]
Sent: 30 June 2004 10:59
To: [email protected]
Subject: Radiance-general Digest, Vol 4, Issue 25

Send Radiance-general mailing list submissions to
[email protected]

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
[email protected]

You can reach the person managing the list at
[email protected]

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 11:46:55 -0400
From: "Martin Moeck" <[email protected]>
Subject: RE: [Radiance-general] RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data
To: "Radiance general discussion"
  <[email protected]>
Message-ID:
  <8[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Model comparisons are tricky. All sorts of calibration and measurement
error5s occur. Do not use a 0.5 m box because it is too small (near field
photometry problems). In addition, black has a reflectance of 5% unless you
have a heavy sand texture, which gets it down to 2%.

A comparison between radiosity code and radiance code is at

www.personal.psu.edu/mum13/agi_rad.pdf

The reflectance is 50% diffuse.

Martin, Penn State

P.S. I would have to run point by point values to do a complete error
analysis, but either Radiance or AGI32 1.7 draws the PAR beam not right. The
Radiance beam looks a little bit too soft.

------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Martin,

Thanks for the reference file.

Have you published any comparison or know of any comparison for lamps and
enclosures such as a black box?

I have constructed a simple 0.5 cube with black walls and lamp socket
central to the ceiling. Should I replace my GE lamp with the PAR lamp?

With the par lamp file you sent me, do I simple draw the lamp as per its
actual dimensions, and assign the rad file to it?

Regards, and thanks for the help,

Anthony

  -----Original Message-----
  From: Krzysztof Wandachowicz [mailto:[email protected]]
  Sent: Thu 7/1/2004 10:29 AM
  To: Radiance general discussion
  Cc:
  Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data

  You can find prepared files for incandescent lamp with clear bulb. The
  only thing you should change is luminous flux in klm, because these
  files are prepared for 100W lamp. Change the line "3 1.35 1.35 1.35" in
  z100p.rad file for "3 0.71 0.71 0.71".

  You can find these files at:
  http://lumen.iee.put.poznan.pl/kw/oprawy/z100p.rad
  http://lumen.iee.put.poznan.pl/kw/oprawy/z100p.dat

  Descriptions are in polish because these materials I've prepared are for
  my students.
  z100p.rad includes all information about lamp, this lamp is assumed as
  small sphere 0.01 radius.
  z100p.dat includes information about light distribution of 100W
  incandescent lamp.

  You have to use Radiance instead of Desktop Radiance to prepare
  calculation.

  Good luck!

  Krzysztof.

  ----- Original Message -----
  From: "Anthony J. Farrell" <[email protected]>
  To: <[email protected]>
  Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2004 1:42 PM
  Subject: [Radiance-general] RE: 60Watt bulb luminaries data

  > I am currently carrying out basic validation techniques of the Radiance
  > software using a black box and standard 60Watt bulb therein.
  >
  > I cannot locate a standard incandescent 60W bulb (just bare hung from
  > ceiling, no lamp shade) on the desktop radiance program.
  >
  > Can anyone help me by way of an add on file for a standard light bulb
  (even
  > if not 60W!) or refer me to a suitable IESNA file?
  >
  > Kind regards
  >
  > Anthony
  >
  > -----Original Message-----
  > From: [email protected]
  > [mailto:[email protected]]On Behalf Of
  > [email protected]
  > Sent: 30 June 2004 10:59
  > To: [email protected]
  > Subject: Radiance-general Digest, Vol 4, Issue 25
  >
  >
  > Send Radiance-general mailing list submissions to
  > [email protected]
  >
  > To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
  > http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general
  > or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
  > [email protected]
  >
  > You can reach the person managing the list at
  > [email protected]

  _______________________________________________
  Radiance-general mailing list
  [email protected]
  http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

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Message: 3
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 13:50:01 +0300
From: Lars O. Grobe <[email protected]>
Subject: [Radiance-general] windows: illum useage?
To: [email protected]
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed

Hi list!

Once again I have to ask a rather basic question, still I could not
find an answer so far.

I have a model of a building which is illuminated solely trough windows
consisting of a grid of small rectangular glass panes in stone framing,
the whole window has an arc. So far I didn't model the panes, and the
light just came in through the frames, which gave not the best results
in the rendering, but I didn't care so far. Now that I will start
modeling the panes, I have to think about how to use the illums later.
As I don't want to keep the artefacts caused by the small openings in
my final rendering, and as I want to speed up rpict, I need to use
illums.

- The first question is how to define the illum geometry.

a) I could define one polygonal surface covering the whole window from
the inside, and using mkillum to "see" the effect of the frame which is
"outside" than. The pro is, that I have to model just two surfaces per
window (one for the illum, and one glass pane which could intersect
with the frame), and I have few light sources in the scene (one per
window). The negative point is that the mkillum is necessary, although
I am not really interested in the outside, so I get some overhead. It
will also be not to easy to define a polygon for the surface, as the
round outline is already converted into a polygon from the cad, and
both have to fit exactly. However, this is what I would conclude from
the advices in Rendering with Radiance (complex fenestration).

b) I could model each pane, place it in its correct location, and than
simply put the gensky pattern on it. No mkillum needed any more (I
actually don't want to look through the windows). The drawback is that
I get a lot of small lightsources (around 40 per window), and I have to
model lots of panes... don't laugh, modeling a rectangular surface is
not that difficult, but I have to make sure that the surface normals
point to the inside, and that is not that easy - I found some problems
in formZ regarding normals and dxf export.

So which way to go? As I noted, I have also have to think about
rendering speed and memory - the model is large, and I am supposed to
produce animations later. And I found the following on the list, which
makes me tend to the b) way:

> Illum's, like all light sources in Radiance, are preferred as
rectangles or (at least)
> 4 or more sided convex shapes. Since Radiance samples a rectangle
with
> equivalent area to the source shape, triangles are a particularly
poor choice.
> I recommend replacing any windows you plan to use as illum's with
rectangles
> for that reason. (Greg Ward)

- A second question, would it make sense to remove the gensky output
except the sun after the illums have been generated if I use procedure
a)? If all openings are covered with illums, I don't need the diffuse
sky and ground any more, as they will be blocked by the illums, right?
Could that give some additional performance? This could also reduce
errors caused by "leakage" in the model.

TIA+CU Lars.
--
Lars O. Grobe
[email protected]

------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 22:06:35 +0300
From: Lars O. Grobe <[email protected]>
Subject: Re: [Radiance-general] colorpict and materials
To: Radiance general discussion <[email protected]>
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed

Hi!

Ok, lets jump into the ring :slight_smile:
Hmm, maybe Lars want three things at once:
1) get the physics right
2) preserve the average color appearance of the material base
3) add the additional color variation from the map without disturbing
1+2 in the average..

Yes!!!! That is what I was not able to describe ;-)))

On the other hand, multiplying a color pattern onto a colored base
will hardly ever produce anything which one expects at first glance,
an extreme example: if you have a red base with r/g/b = 0.2 / 0.02 /
0.0 you can multiply in maps like mad and will never get something
blue into the picture.

Yes, this is true, I was just guessing that it can't be that easy :wink:

I think that Lars wants some sprinkles and streaks and dots of blue
added to the base here and there, but so little in covered surface,
that the average color and thus the brightness of the base does not
suffer much.

That (the average) is necessary, while the details (e.g. those famous
sprinkles and streaks and dots would be nice).

What about the following: (yeah, again one of my weird ideas:-) edit
the picture (resp. the red parts of it) with some color tool in an
image manipulation program like Gimp such that the average rgb values
for the dominating parts of the pic are those of the plastic
description, then it could be used as colorpict to a new plastic with
rgb=1/1/1. This new combination will more or less have the same color
(in the spatial average) as the original base material, but still look
like the pattern.

In fact, I hoped that this could be somehow done with the radiance
tools in a script, I just don't know how. It's similar to what normpat
is doing, only it doesn't normalize to 1/1/1, but to R/G/B values I
know as the average material color (->brightness). I think I will have
to take a look at normpat to find out how it does that in detail -
would be a nice tool if it could bring pictures to (known) color values.

Thanks, CU Lars.
--
Lars O. Grobe
[email protected]

------------------------------

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