Art work surface

Hello All,

We are remodeling our house to add an art studio,
and I wanted to poll this list of experts.
What are recommended light levels and glare tolerances for creating artwork?

After a brief search, I'm guessing 400 lux?
I would be using both horizontal and vertical work surfaces

How about glare threshold?
In any given view, would it be 7 times the average luminance level?
"Findglare normally identifies glare sources as directions that are
brighter than 7 times the average luminance level."

I'm thinking of using skylights with a diffusion layer - as was posted
sometime back on this list

thanks in advance!

Rob F

What is the nature of the artwork?
For example, I would approach the illumination of each of these quite
differently: woodblock carving/print making area
thrown pottery
detailed watercolor
large expressive acrylic painting
jewelry making

-Rob Shakespeare

···

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of
Fitzsimmons, Rob
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2006 12:11 PM
To: '[email protected]'
Subject: [Radiance-general] Art work surface

Hello All,

We are remodeling our house to add an art studio,
and I wanted to poll this list of experts.
What are recommended light levels and glare tolerances for creating
artwork?

After a brief search, I'm guessing 400 lux?
I would be using both horizontal and vertical work surfaces

How about glare threshold?
In any given view, would it be 7 times the average luminance level?
"Findglare normally identifies glare sources as directions that are
brighter than 7 times the average luminance level."

I'm thinking of using skylights with a diffusion layer - as was posted
sometime back on this list

thanks in advance!

Rob F

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

Good question..
I will mainly be painting medium to large acrylic / oil

my wife may do fabric or mixed media scultpure.
Probably no detailed jewlery

Thanks

···

-----Original Message-----
From: Shakespeare, Robert A.
To: Radiance general discussion
Sent: 5/25/2006 10:52 AM
Subject: RE: [Radiance-general] Art work surface

What is the nature of the artwork?
For example, I would approach the illumination of each of these quite
differently: woodblock carving/print making area
thrown pottery
detailed watercolor
large expressive acrylic painting
jewelry making

-Rob Shakespeare

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of
Fitzsimmons, Rob
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2006 12:11 PM
To: '[email protected]'
Subject: [Radiance-general] Art work surface

Hello All,

We are remodeling our house to add an art studio,
and I wanted to poll this list of experts.
What are recommended light levels and glare tolerances for creating
artwork?

After a brief search, I'm guessing 400 lux?
I would be using both horizontal and vertical work surfaces

How about glare threshold?
In any given view, would it be 7 times the average luminance level?
"Findglare normally identifies glare sources as directions that are
brighter than 7 times the average luminance level."

I'm thinking of using skylights with a diffusion layer - as was posted
sometime back on this list

thanks in advance!

Rob F

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

I will mainly be painting medium to large acrylic / oil

my wife may do fabric or mixed media scultpure.
Probably no detailed jewlery

Hi,

I think if you have around 500lx it will be fine. But for you the light
quality might become more important. E.g. glare would be not acceptable,
if you are painting, you would want a continous color and possibly light
level. I think that is why these good old atelier windows were directed
to north - big surface (diffuse-bright rooms), continous (non-direct)
light over the day. I am not sure about the sculptures, but I think for
working on them, the same applies (directional light will be nice to
present them, but while working could be irritating).

I wonder if all these great new materials would not be great for this
kind of project... just thinking about translucent insulation panels
(these blocks filled with small glass tubes), giving diffuse light
without the thermal drawback of the old atelier window idea...? I am
just telling that to you because I would be curious how you render the
design in Radiance... :slight_smile:

CU + have fun (you are an architect, too, aren't you?), Lars-

Lars O. Grobe:

I think that is
why these good old atelier windows were directed to north -
big surface (diffuse-bright rooms), continous (non-direct)
light over the day.

They were directed to north because they had to be huge and
you had to avoid direct sunlight. Northern light also varies
not much over the day.

I am not sure about the sculptures, but I
think for working on them, the same applies (directional
light will be nice to present them, but while working could
be irritating).

Only directional light would indeed be irritating but you
need a certain directional component to render the shape.
Again, use big windows (for the light level) and use them
in one side of the room (for the directional component).
If you can use windows, of couse.

I wonder if all these great new materials would not be great
for this kind of project... just thinking about translucent
insulation panels (these blocks filled with small glass
tubes), giving diffuse light without the thermal drawback of
the old atelier window idea...?

No! Don't use that stuff! We had an exhibition pavillion in
my university built with honeycomb insulation between two
glass profiles. The profiles alone might have worked well but
the building inspector insisted in an insulation of the wall.
The honeycombs diffuse the light so much that there is hardly
a directional component left. It looks odd and the sculptures
and architectural modells are shaded poorly even if the interior
is rather bright.

Thomas

···

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If you have any queries, please contact the sender.
***********************************************************************************
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Registered in England No 2207415:
Registered Office: Building Design Partnership Ltd, Sunlight House, PO Box 85, Quay Street, Manchester, M60 3JA, http://www.bdp.co.uk
***********************************************************************************

Hi Thomas!

They were directed to north because they had to be huge and
you had to avoid direct sunlight. Northern light also varies
not much over the day.

Ok... that is what I wanted to describe as continous ;-)))

Only directional light would indeed be irritating but you
need a certain directional component to render the shape.

Well, if you have no clear window at all you also might get mad.

No! Don't use that stuff! We had an exhibition pavillion in
my university built with honeycomb insulation between two
glass profiles. The profiles alone might have worked well but
the building inspector insisted in an insulation of the wall.
The honeycombs diffuse the light so much that there is hardly
a directional component left. It looks odd and the sculptures
and architectural modells are shaded poorly even if the interior
is rather bright.

That sounds interesting, as I actually do not have experienced such a room. Were the panels used on all sides or to one direction only? My idea was to have a big diffuse-translucent wall (only) to north. Also Ithink that for an exhibition pavillion, especially for architectural models, a diffuse environment is a terrific idea. All those I know use spots to take fotos of their models and to show them (of course with a diffuse environment around).

But I really wonder on the impact of these panels on color, did you experience any noticable effect? It would also interesting to know what happens after some years, at least with those based on plastics (I would not worry about the glass-based products, but I am also not sure here). Christopher has done validation work on such panels, maybe he has more to say about it.

···

Thomas

***********************************************************************************
This e-mail, (and any attachments) is confidential and may be privileged.
It may be read, copied and used by the intended addressee only. If you
have received this in error please contact BDP immediately.

If you have any queries, please contact the sender.
***********************************************************************************
Building Design Partnership
Registered in England No 2207415:
Registered Office: Building Design Partnership Ltd, Sunlight House, PO Box
85, Quay Street, Manchester, M60 3JA, http://www.bdp.co.uk
***********************************************************************************

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

Here is version 1 of our remodel

http://www.geocities.com/rastermon/Version1.html
The designer is using Sketchup and I'm rendering with - of course -
Radiance.
Composite done in photosop.
Radiance view did not match pic, so I did a little skewing in PS.

Thanks for all the input on art lighting - I'll post pics as it comes
along.

Rob

···

-----Original Message-----
From: Lars Grobe
To: Radiance general discussion
Sent: 5/26/2006 2:05 AM
Subject: Re: RE: [Radiance-general] Art work surface

Hi Thomas!

They were directed to north because they had to be huge and
you had to avoid direct sunlight. Northern light also varies
not much over the day.

Ok... that is what I wanted to describe as continous ;-)))

Only directional light would indeed be irritating but you
need a certain directional component to render the shape.

Well, if you have no clear window at all you also might get mad.

No! Don't use that stuff! We had an exhibition pavillion in
my university built with honeycomb insulation between two
glass profiles. The profiles alone might have worked well but
the building inspector insisted in an insulation of the wall.
The honeycombs diffuse the light so much that there is hardly
a directional component left. It looks odd and the sculptures
and architectural modells are shaded poorly even if the interior
is rather bright.

That sounds interesting, as I actually do not have experienced such a
room. Were the panels used on all sides or to one direction only? My
idea was to have a big diffuse-translucent wall (only) to north. Also
Ithink that for an exhibition pavillion, especially for architectural
models, a diffuse environment is a terrific idea. All those I know use
spots to take fotos of their models and to show them (of course with a
diffuse environment around).

But I really wonder on the impact of these panels on color, did you
experience any noticable effect? It would also interesting to know what
happens after some years, at least with those based on plastics (I would
not worry about the glass-based products, but I am also not sure here).
Christopher has done validation work on such panels, maybe he has more
to say about it.

Thomas

************************************************************************
***********

This e-mail, (and any attachments) is confidential and may be

privileged.

It may be read, copied and used by the intended addressee only. If

you

have received this in error please contact BDP immediately.

If you have any queries, please contact the sender.

************************************************************************
***********

Building Design Partnership
Registered in England No 2207415:
Registered Office: Building Design Partnership Ltd, Sunlight House, PO

Box

85, Quay Street, Manchester, M60 3JA, http://www.bdp.co.uk

************************************************************************
***********

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Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general

_______________________________________________
Radiance-general mailing list
[email protected]
http://www.radiance-online.org/mailman/listinfo/radiance-general