a note of thanks

hello all,

id just like to say a thankyou to john, greg, alexa and thomas for welcoming
me to the group and giving me some valuable advice with which to start my
work. i personally cant afford your book greg (i berely have £30 for food a
week) but i will see if npl will buy it on my behalf because it does appear to
be very useful (judging by the tutorial i have done). ive saved your paper too
alexa and will read it in the very new future, thanks. that site looks very
interesting thomas, should help a lot.

i have a question to the group if anyone would be kind enough to answer it.
my boss has told me to look at gettin a CAD program to use in partnership with
radiance, specifically AutoCAD. does anyone know where i can get this, and if
it is wise to do so? or alternatively can anyone recommend any other CAD
programs? im using radiance on a linux system as a point of note.

thanks again
chris

···

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hi chris
depending on whether autodesk have involved your university or not, you can get the student version of autocad free, from www.architectsrule.org - seeing as the full version costs several thousands of ��, that seems like a good idea!
although i believe its pretty hard (if not impossible?) to run autocad on linux - you could of course do the modelling on a windows computer, and then just transfer the finished file across to the linux computer.

hope that helps
will

Chris Foster wrote:

···

hello all,

id just like to say a thankyou to john, greg, alexa and thomas for welcoming
me to the group and giving me some valuable advice with which to start my
work. i personally cant afford your book greg (i berely have �30 for food a
week) but i will see if npl will buy it on my behalf because it does appear to
be very useful (judging by the tutorial i have done). ive saved your paper too
alexa and will read it in the very new future, thanks. that site looks very
interesting thomas, should help a lot.

i have a question to the group if anyone would be kind enough to answer it.
my boss has told me to look at gettin a CAD program to use in partnership with
radiance, specifically AutoCAD. does anyone know where i can get this, and if
it is wise to do so? or alternatively can anyone recommend any other CAD
programs? im using radiance on a linux system as a point of note.

thanks again
chris

-------------------------------------------------------------------
This e-mail and any attachments may contain confidential and/or
privileged material; it is for the intended addressee(s) only.
If you are not a named addressee, you must not use, retain or
disclose such information.

NPL Management Ltd cannot guarantee that the e-mail or any
attachments are free from viruses.

NPL Management Ltd. Registered in England and Wales. No: 2937881
Registered Office: Serco House, 16 Bartley Wood Business Park,
Hook, Hampshire, United Kingdom RG27 9UY
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------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Chris,

i have a question to the group if anyone would be kind enough to answer it.
my boss has told me to look at gettin a CAD program to use in partnership with
radiance, specifically AutoCAD. does anyone know where i can get this, and if
it is wise to do so? or alternatively can anyone recommend any other CAD
programs? im using radiance on a linux system as a point of note.

Hard to make any sort of recommendation without knowing what you intend to model. Unless you are already up to working speed with AutoCAD, you may find that it is much easier to learn how to use Radiance scene generators to create the model than it is to learn how to use AutoCAD. The 3D models for these (now ancient) scenes were all created using scripts (images at the foot of the page):

http://www.iesd.dmu.ac.uk/~jm/resources.html

The Radiance book gives lots of examples on creating geometry using scripts etc. I'd certainly recommend considering this approach in the first instance.

-John

···

-----------------------------------------------
Dr. John Mardaljevic
Senior Research Fellow
Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development
De Montfort University
The Gateway
Leicester
LE1 9BH, UK
+44 (0) 116 257 7972
+44 (0) 116 257 7981 (fax)

[email protected]
http://www.iesd.dmu.ac.uk/~jm

Hi!

although i believe its pretty hard (if not impossible?) to run autocad
on linux - you could of course do the modelling on a windows computer,
and then just transfer the finished file across to the linux computer.

Take a look at www.winehq.com (or org, not sure, it is about the wine project, allowing to run windows-apps under Linux (x86). There is also a directory of apps known to work.

As an alternative, there is Intellicad, which was available free (?) at least some years ago and is very similar to Autocad.

I do not know about any good free 3d-CAD packages for Linux. There are good modelers (AC3d, Blender, ...). Also there are some commercial modelers free for private or education use, like Houdini, Maya etc. In general, real CAD has to be paid under Linux. And as you mentioned your boss, it is not clear to me if you work on a school project or a commercial one.

I did most work on formZ (Mac, but is available for Windows, too). Great tool, but expensive.

Whatever you choose, exporting obj is really valuable, all other formats have drawbacks. Dxf is still well supported by Georg Mischler's dxf2rad, but some advanced features of Radiance are bound to obj.

CU Lars.

Although Intellicad is not free it costs significantly less than Autocad. Checkout www.bricscad.com. They do have a linux version. The real question here (perhaps for Georg) is whether radout will run in intellicad. At least one other option might be Rhino. By comparison to Autocad these are both cheap options.

-Jack

Lars Grobe wrote:

···

Hi!

although i believe its pretty hard (if not impossible?) to run autocad on linux - you could of course do the modelling on a windows computer, and then just transfer the finished file across to the linux computer.
    
Take a look at www.winehq.com (or org, not sure, it is about the wine project, allowing to run windows-apps under Linux (x86). There is also a directory of apps known to work.

As an alternative, there is Intellicad, which was available free (?) at least some years ago and is very similar to Autocad.

I do not know about any good free 3d-CAD packages for Linux. There are good modelers (AC3d, Blender, ...). Also there are some commercial modelers free for private or education use, like Houdini, Maya etc. In general, real CAD has to be paid under Linux. And as you mentioned your boss, it is not clear to me if you work on a school project or a commercial one.

I did most work on formZ (Mac, but is available for Windows, too). Great tool, but expensive.

Whatever you choose, exporting obj is really valuable, all other formats have drawbacks. Dxf is still well supported by Georg Mischler's dxf2rad, but some advanced features of Radiance are bound to obj.

CU Lars.

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--
# Jack de Valpine
# president
#
# visarc incorporated
# http://www.visarc.com
#
# channeling technology for superior design and construction

I've had a good time modelling with Wings3D, which is far from CAD. It's
primarily a polygonal modeller for creating sub-divisional meshes. I create
some weird shape and when I'm happy with it I hit 's' a few times to
sub-divide the mesh and save as an OBJ file. Then it's off to obj2mesh and
putting the object into a scene.

Here's my latest work, including an iridescent colorfunc:
http://www.deviantart.com/view/33287687/

I'm currently slogging through rendering an animation of this object and
its colourful material.

I'd steer clear of DXF unless you're using AutoCAD. AutoDesk has refused
to document the file format and has stated that their software is the only
software that can handle DXF properly. So I'd avoid it if I could.
Although I guess running ToRAD or whatever within AutoCAD is probably
alright.

AutoDesk have also hitched their wagon to Microsoft's, ruling out any
non-Windows ports of their software. So personally, I've given them the
big middle finger and am ignoring them. Others have provided names of
other CAD packages, some of which are available on Linux.

Hope this helps,
bye

···

On Fri, 19 May 2006 17:30:51 +0200 "Lars Grobe" <[email protected]> wrote:

I do not know about any good free 3d-CAD packages for Linux. There are
good modelers (AC3d, Blender, ...). Also there are some commercial
modelers free for private or education use, like Houdini, Maya etc. In
general, real CAD has to be paid under Linux. And as you mentioned your
boss, it is not clear to me if you work on a school project or a
commercial one.

I did most work on formZ (Mac, but is available for Windows, too). Great
tool, but expensive.

Whatever you choose, exporting obj is really valuable, all other formats
have drawbacks. Dxf is still well supported by Georg Mischler's dxf2rad,
but some advanced features of Radiance are bound to obj.